Is Laughter the Best Medicine?

We all have heard the phrase “Laughter is the best medicine” Well it is! In yogic terms, it’s really the highest form of pranayama, the art of breathing. It expands and stretches your inhales and exhales challenging you without you even knowing it. There are short breaths, hahahaha hehehehehehehe. Long breaths, aaaaahaaaaaaahaaaaahaaaaaa. Combo breaths: waaahahahahahahaha.

There is also a school for Laughter Yoga. Laughter Yoga combines Unconditional Laughter with Yogic Breathing (Pranayama). Anyone can Laugh for No Reason, without relying on humor, jokes or comedy. The concept of Laughter Yoga is based on a scientific fact that the body cannot differentiate between fake and real laughter. One gets the same physiological and psychological benefits. It brings good health and joy. Laughter is universal with no language and cultural barriers. It fosters a positive and hopeful attitude. It is less likely for a person to succumb to stress and feelings of depression, if one is able to laugh away the troubles. So keep laughing and be happy! 🙂

Reference

http://liveloveyoga.wordpress.com/
http://www.laughteryoga.org/

Chhandogya Upanishad on Food

“When the food is pure, the whole nature becomes pure; when the nature becomes pure, the memory becomes firm; and when a man is in possession of a firm memory, all the ties are severed.”

(Chhandogya Upanishad, VII—xxvi-2)

Mind is made of food

Mind is manufactured out of the food that we take. Subtlest part of food reaches upward to the heart and thence entering the arteries, and thereby bringing into existence the aggregate of the organs of speech and being changed into the form of the mind, it increases the mind.

As per Chhandogya Upanishad, the food that we take is transformed in three different ways: the gross or the heaviest part of it becomes the excrement; that of medium density is transformed into flesh and the finest part goes to form the mind. Just as in the churning of curd, its fine particles rise up and are transformed into butter, so when food is consumed, the subtlest part rises up and is transformed into mind.

QUALITY OF MIND DEPENDS UPON QUALITY OF FOOD

Food has a direct and intimate connection with the mind and plays a vital part in the make-up of the mind. Sattvic diet calms the mind. Rajasic diet excites the mind. Note the difference in nature between a tiger which lives on flesh and a cow which lives on grass. Food exercises important influence on the mind. You see it clearly every day. It is very difficult to control the mind after a heavy, sumptuous, indigestible, meal. The mind runs, wanders and jumps like a monkey all the time. Alcohol causes tremendous excitement in the mind.

Food plays an important role in meditation. For purposes of meditation, the food must be light, Sattvic and nutritious. The body is made up of food. When the quality of the mind depends upon the quality of the food taken, it is natural to insist in the interest of the highest morality upon a kind of Sattvic regimen of diet for those aspirants who lead a contemplative life and householders who are attempting to lead a spiritual life in the world.

WHEN FOOD CAN BE DISPENSED

Food is only a mass of energy. Water supplies energy to the body. Air also furnishes energy. You can live without food for very many days, but you cannot live without air even for some minutes. Oxygen is even more important. What is wanted to support the body is energy. If you can supply the energy from any other source, you can dispense with food entirely. Yogis keep up the body without food by drinking nectar. This nectar flows through a hole in the palate. It dribbles and nourishes the body. A Jnani (Self Realized Person) can draw energy directly from his pure, irresistible will and support the body without food. If you know the process of drawing the energy from the cosmic energy or solar energy, you can maintain the body with this energy alone for any length of time and can dispense with food.

FINAL NOTE

Evolution is better than revolution. Do not make sudden changes in anything, particularly in
food. Let the change be gradual. The system should accommodate it without any hitch. Natura non facil saltum (nature never moves by leaps). Take any food that suits you. Do not make much fuss about it. Any food that is readily available and that agrees with your system is harmless.

REFERENCE

Mind – Its Mysteries and Control by Sri Swami Sivananda

Healthy Mind is Healthy Body

MUTUAL INFLUENCE BETWEEN MIND AND BODY

The mind is intimately connected with the body. The mind acts upon the body and the body reacts upon the mind. Mind has influence over the body. A pure, healthy mind means a healthy body. Grief in the mind weakens the body. Body influences the mind also in its turn. If the body is strong and healthy, the mind also becomes healthy and strong. If the body is sick, the mind also becomes sick. A pain in the stomach causes depression in the mind.

THE PRIMARY CAUSE OF DISEASE

The primary cause of diseases which afflict the body is bad thoughts. Whatever you hold in your mind will be produced in the physical body. Any ill-feeling or bitterness towards another person will at once affect the body and produce some kind of disease in the body. Intense passion, hatred, longstanding bitter jealousy, corroding anxiety, fits of hot temper actually destroy the cells of the body and induce disease of the heart, liver, kidneys, spleen and stomach.

When the mind is agitated, then this body also is agitated. Wherever the body goes, the mind follows. When both the body and mind are agitated, the Prana flows in a wrong direction. Instead of pervading the whole body steadily and equally, it will vibrate at an unequal rate (unrhythmically). Then the food is not digested properly. Diseases originate. If the primary cause is removed, then all diseases will disappear.

The pains that afflict the physical body are called secondary diseases, whilst one that affect the mind are termed mental or primary diseases. If bad thoughts are destroyed, all bodily diseases will vanish. Purity of mind means healthy body. Therefore, be careful in your thinking, in the selection of your thoughts. Always entertain noble, sublime, loving and kind thoughts. You will have harmony, health and beauty.

A LAMENTABLE PRACTICE

It is lamentable, indeed, to note that most of the doctors in the world, do more harm than good to their patients. They exaggerate the nature of the disease to their patients. They fill their minds with imaginary fears of all sorts. They do not know the power of suggestions and their influences on the minds of their patients. As greed is ingrained in their minds, as the desire to become rich is deep-rooted in their minds, they try their level best to extract from their patients as much money as they can. If they say to their patients, “This disease is nothing. I will make you all right within a couple of hours,..” who is going to pay them amply? They give wrong suggestions to their patients: “This is a terrible disease. This is an incurable disease. A dangerous poison, a dangerous microbe is lurking in your lungs..”. The poor patient spends sleepless nights on account of imaginary fear, on account of wrong suggestion given by the doctor. Every moment he thinks, I may die at any moment. The doctor has said that my disease is dangerous and incurable. He drags a cheerless existence. The worry and anxiety and fear destroy millions of red blood-corpuscles daily. The doctor gives the wrong suggestions to glorify his skill, dexterity in the profession also.

PAIN IS IN MIND ONLY

Pain is evident so long as you connect yourself with the mind. There is no pain in sleep. If there is an inflammatory swelling on your back with throbbing pain, you do not experience any pain at night when you are asleep. Only when the mind is connected with the diseased part through nerves and thinking, you begin to experience pain. There is no pain when the mind is disconnected from the body by the administration of chloroform. During moments of great joy, the severe pain entirely ceases, as the mind is taken away from the body, from the seat of the pain. If you can consciously withdraw the mind from the diseased part by concentrating it on God or any other attractive object, you will not experience any pain even when you are wide awake. If you have a powerful will and strong power of endurance, then also you will not experience any pain. By constant thinking of any trouble or disease, you only augment your pain and suffering. Pain is only in mind. Soul is full of bliss.

CONQUER THE MIND TO CONTROL THE BODY

With the majority of mankind, the mind is greatly under the control of the body. Their minds being very little developed, they live as food coverings mostly. Develop the Intellect and, through Intellect, control the Mind. The Intellect is developed by abstract thinking and reasoning, by systematic meditation. When you have controlled the mind, you have perfect control over the body. The body is only a shadow of the mind. It is the mould prepared by the mind for its expression. The body becomes your slave when you have conquered the mind.

 

REFERENCE

Mind – Its Mysteries and Control by Sri Swami Sivananda

Siddha – Food is Medicine

Origin

The Siddha System of Medicine (Traditional Tamil System of medicine), which has been prevalent in the ancient Tamil land, is the foremost of all other medical systems in the world. Its origin goes back to B.C 10,000 to B.C 4,000. As per the textual and archeological evidences which indicate the remote antiquity of the Dravidian civilization of the erstwhile submerged land Kumarikandam, that is the Lemuria continent situated in the Indian ocean, the Siddha System of Medicine is contemporaneous with those of the submerged lands Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Chinese and Grecian medicines. The uniqueness of Siddha System is evident by its continuous service to the humanity for more than 5000 years in combating diseases and also in maintaining its physical, mental and moral health while many of its contemporaries had become extinct long ago.

The roots of the ancient Siddha System are intertwined with the mythology and culture of the ancient Tamil civilization that existed in the southernmost tip of the Indian peninsula, predating much of recorded history.

Mythically, the origin of Siddha is attributed to Lord Siva, who is supposed to have handed it down to his consort Parvathi (Shakthi), who in turn passed on the sacred knowledge to Nandi, from whom it was transmitted to the first of “Siddhars”. Siddha is a Tamil word derived from “siddhi” — attaining perfection in life or heavenly bliss.

The system is said to have emerged in antiquity, from the highly evolved consciousness of the Siddhars. The clarified intellect and heightened intuition of the Siddhars, resulting from their yogic powers, enabled them to explore the world around them and exploit its natural resources for the sake of humanity. Their findings on the characteristics of plants, metals, minerals and animal products and their knowledge of the properties of drugs, its purification, processing, fixing dosage, toxicity, antidote and clinical application, were preserved in the form of verses for the use of the posterity.

This unique legacy was bequeathed to select disciples or “chidas” by word of mouth. It is believed that there was a line of 18 siddhars, with Agasthya being the foremost and a large portion of Siddha lore is credited to him. With time, this oral tradition was transcribed on palm leaf manuscripts that now serve as the major repository of the knowledge.

The contributors of Siddha system, the Siddhars, of Tamil land, were mystics, yogis, poets, devotees, seers and medical men of various combinations and various statures. They were super human beings who possessed supernatural powers (like Eight types of Siddhis). They were the greatest scientists of ancient times and were the guardians of the world and they existed, and still exist, for the benefit of the public at large. They were men of great practical knowledge and wisdom. They had full awareness of the nature and activities of all the objects in this planet and of all times-past, present and future. They were mainly responsible for the growth and development not only of Tamil medicine that includes alchemy, medicine, yoga, kayakalpa (rejuvenation therapy), philosophy, astronomy, astrology, varma, muppu, thokkanam etc., but also for many other sciences of public utility.

Guiding principles

According to the Siddha system, the individual is a microcosm of the universe. The human body consists of the five primordial elements-earth, water, fire, air and space, the three humours-vatha, pitta and kapha and seven physical constituents. Food is the basic building material of the human body and gets processed into humours, tissues and wastes. The equilibrium of humours is considered as health and its disturbance or imbalance leads to a diseased state; Saint Thiruvalluvar has indicated the same view in his Thirukural,

“Miginum Kuraiyinum Noi Seyyum Noolor

Vali Mudhala Enniya Moondru” – Kural 941

“Three things beginning with wind, say experts,

In excess or lacking cause disease” – Kural 941

Reflecting this theory of cosmic oneness, the five senses are said to correspond with the five elements. Ether (Veli) is responsible for hearing; air (katru) for sense of touch; fire (thee) for sight; water (neer) for taste; and earth (mann) for the sense of smell.

Mind – Body continuum

Siddha is a comprehensive system that places equal emphasis on the body, mind and spirit and strives to restore the innate harmony of the individual. Treatment is aimed at restoring balance to the mind-body system. Diet and lifestyle play a major role not only in maintaining health but also in curing diseases. This concept of the Siddha medicine is termed as pathiam and apathiam, which is essentially a list of do’s and don’ts.

“Food itself is medicine and medicine itself is food”

Materia Medica

Drugs used by the Siddhars can be classified into three groups: Thaavaram (herbal product), Thaathu (inorganic substances), and Jangamam (animal products).

Unique diagnostic methodology

The diagnostic methodology in Siddha treatment is unique as it is made purely on the basis of the clinical acumen of the physician. The pulse, skin, tongue, complexion, speech, eye, stools and urine are examined. This approach is collectively known as “Eight types of examination”; and among the eight, the examination of pulse is very important in confirming the diagnosis.

Concept of Siddha treatment

Treatment consists of three distinct categories: Deva Maruthuvam, (divine method); Maanida Maruthuvam (rational method); and Asura Maruthuvam (surgical method). In the divine method, medicines like parpam, chenduram, guru, kuligai prepared from mercury, sulphur and pashanams are used. In the rational method, medicines prepared from herbs like churanam, kudineer, vadagam are used. In surgical method, incision, excision, heat application, bloodletting, leech application etc. are practised.

The therapeutic treatment in Siddha could be further categorized into Purgative therapy, Emetic therapy, Fasting therapy, Steam therapy, Oleation therapy, Physical therapy, Solar therapy, Blood letting therapy and Yoga therapy.

There is also a branch of the traditional science that deals with traumatology and accidental injuries called Varma. This is based on the notion of more than 100 vital points that are junctions of bones, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels and nerves called Varma points. Pranic energy is found concentrated in these points which, upon manipulation, produce curative effect.

Siddha system has enormous pharmacopoeia containing vegetable, animal and mineral products and treatment techniques consisting in use of 32 types of internal medicines and 32 types of external medicines, application of heat and cold, ointments, potions and poultice, blood letting, counter irritation, bath, suction, manipulative processes such as thokkanam, varma, yoga and concentration on hygiene and diet (pathiam), periodical use of purgatives and emetics, use of drugs which include, apart from herbs, preparations from metals and minerals such as copper, silver, gold, lead and preparations from products of animal origin such as brain, liver, bones, blood, skull, horns of various animals, tissues of reptiles and also Kayakalpa to prevent or postpone greying of hair, formation of wrinkles and ageing, prevention or treatment of diseases, and postponement of death (to any desired length of time). Some empirical treatment techniques under the guise of magic exorcism, incantation, pilgrimage, peregrinations, mountaineering and similar activities have also been in practice since ages.

Classification of Siddha Medicines

Siddha medicines may be roughly divided into three classes— (i) Miracle medicines, (ii) Sophisticated medicines and (iii) Common medicines. Miracle medicines are becoming rare and should be learnt directly from the masters who, having undergone all forms of initiation and hazards of apprenticeship, have reached perfection in all respects. Sophisticated medicines may be scientifically prepared and used by the well trained physicians without much risk. Common medicines are most simple and cheap ones which were in wide use till the beginning of the 20th century and are still in use in remote rural areas of our country.

Kundalini Yoga

The Siddhars have evolved a special technique for attaining spiritual awakening by rousing, with yoga techniques like aasana, praanaayaama and dhyaana (meditation), the Kundalini shakthi (Serpent power) lying dormant at the base of the spinal column in the region of the sacral plexus. Only by caring for his mortal inheritance, man is able to arrive at the realization of his highest potentialities. By working in unison with theology and philosophy, Siddha medicine aids bringing to maturity the quiescent gem of immortal divine being in his mortal body.

Siddha Education

The Siddha system of education in ancient India was not imparted or organized on the scale of mass education like schools and colleges, but the ideal of education was to treat it as a secret and sacred process, for the reason that the process of an individual growth (especially the inner growth) can only be achieved by a close and constant touch between the teacher and the taught in their personal relationship from which the whole world was excluded.

The teaching was imparted in the form of verses, many of them in ambiguous language and handed down to the posterity by the guru-sishya (teacher-disciple) tradition. The sacred medicines and techniques were taught only to a close circle of disciples and this trend continued to exist till recently.

Siddha education has turned into a mass institutional education around the middle of the 20th Century and has been catering to the needs of the public. Developments in academic side and also in scientific research have been coming up. A scientific research of available Siddha literature may bring us precious truths, methods of preparation of miracle medicines of mineral, vegetable and animal origin and this would be a valuable contribution to the medical world today. In addition to the literature written in palm leaf manuscripts etc., there are many valuable medicines and treatment techniques in practice. Steps are being taken by the government for collecting, screening, analyzing and codifying the available manuscripts, printed books, traditional recipes, medical secrets and many other things found scattered in disciplines and activities seemingly unconnected with medicine.

Contemporary relevance of Siddha

There has been a resurgence of traditional medical systems the world over, based on the holistic nature of their approach to healing. The efficacy of indigenous systems has been proved in various contexts. They tend to use locally available, cost effective materials for treatment. Hence, the Siddha system which also has strong cultural and historical bonds with the people of Tamil Nadu is becoming increasingly relevant.

SOURCE

http://www.nischennai.org/about-siddha.htm

Varman Model

By Dr. Mark Phillips
posted by Ganesh

The Dravidian varman model

The Ayurvedic use of the word marman (acupoint) is synonymous with the word varman in South India. Dravidia refers to the regions of South India and includes the spoken languages of Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Telugu, and Tulu. There are three subgroups within the Dravidian linguistic family: North Dravidian, Central Dravidian, and South Dravidian, matching for the most part the corresponding regions in the Indian subcontinent.

Dravidian medicine includes much of Ayurvedic theory, but also recognises distinct varman therapeutics. Dravidian practitioners have identified two main groups of varman, supported by classical Dravidian texts on Siddha medicine and varman techniques. This grouping of varman is not found in Ayurvedic theory, although both systems philosophically agree upon a common source of varman.

The two groups of Dravidian varman are:

  1. padu varman, and
  2. thodu varman.

According to Dravidian theory, these two groups are believed to incorporate the entire nervous system of the human body. “Padu and thodu varman allows the intangible signs of life (such as the mind, desires and intellect) to manifest within the life-centres of the body, and to express action in the world” (Nair, interview, 17/9/98).

Dravidian varman theories

The Dravidian Siddha theory concerning the 12 padu varman and their relationship to the 96 thodu varman demonstrates an important addition to the theories commonly held by Ayurvedic practitioners. This information is significant to Ayurvedic theory when attempting to understand the relationship between groups of marman and their theoretical role in maintaining balance in the human body. The importance of Dravidian varman theories is further highlighted by the opinion of scholars who hold that the Dravidian text Odivu Murivu Sara Suthram by the sage Agastya is likely to predate the records of the Ayurvedic author Susruta.

The Dravidian text Odivu Murivu Sara Suthram holds that the three kalai (primal influences of kundalini – Ida, Pingala and Sushumna) support the 108 varman as three groups of four padu varman and 12 groups of eight thodu varman (see table 1).


According to Dravidian practitioners, the 12 padu are considered to be very important, and of these, three varman are believed to be the most important. They are identified in Sanskrit as basti, hridaya and sthapani marman and are believed to be the three “root” marman associated with the “tripod of life”(See fig.1 left)

Chinese acupuncture similarities to Ayurvedic and Dravidian theories of varman

  1. The three marman – basti, hridaya and sthapani – correlate with the Chinese points on Ren and Du mai. These points are guanyuan (Ren4), shangzhong (Ren17) and yintang (Du24.5) respectively (see Figure 1 right). These three points are important energy centres in Chinese theory. They are significant in Daoist health exercises, as well as Chinese martial arts and alchemy, and play an important role in Chinese acupuncture.
  2. There appear to be similarities between the Dravidian concept of the three primary channels “supporting the 12 padu channels” and the Chinese idea of the three primary (ancestral) channels of Ren mai, Chong mai and Du mai, “giving rise to the 12 channels of the body”:Chong mai and Ren mai originate from the inside of the uterus, a branch rises up in front of the spine, making the ocean of the twelve meridians (Huang Di Neijing Lingshu, Chapter 65, quoted by Matsumoto and Birch, 1986, p 31).


The Chinese believe that the three channels of Chong maiRen mai and Du mai originate from an ancestral (prenatal) source and are interrelated:

This is why we can say the Du mai, Ren mai and Chong mai have different names but are all the same (Wang Bing; quoted from the Nei Jing Jie Po Sheng Li Xue; Matsumoto and Birch, 1986, p 17).

Similarly, the Dravidian view of the 12 padu varman is that they are manifested from the three energies (kalai) (see Table 1), which are believed to have a single origin – universal prana. An apparent correlation between the two systems of Chinese and Indian theory regarding the origin of the channels is presented (see Table 2) and their location on the human body with a comparison to Chinese acupoints (see Table 3).


Kundalini


Practitioners from the state of Tamil Nadu and Kerala believe that the “life centres” (chakras) were the key to understanding the varman effect. These “life centres” are also recognised in Ayurveda but they are mainly used by those practitioners of yoga who develop the kundalini, the essential energy which is said to flow through the region of the spine in the human body. It is believed by Ayurvedic and Dravidian practitioners that the three major energy channels (kalai) which constitute the kundalini, commonly known as the Ida, Pingala and Sushumna, form the main nerve centres (chakras) in the body and are the intermediaries of marman effects. The Sushumna is said to flow up the spine and the Ida and Pingala alternate sides between the chakras, represented by the early Vedic symbol shown in Figure 2.


Dravidian practitioners often refer to the theory of a central energy source in the human body. In this theory, the seven major nerve centres (chakras), which act as a plexus for the three primary nerve channels of the kundalini, make possible the effects of the varman. The network of varman is believed to exist because of an indirect connection to the source of the kundalini and its associated chakras. This connection is brought about through a hierarchy of varman which can be summarised in two primary groups, the padu and thodu varman (Nair, interview, 19/9/98). Each of the 12 padu varman collects impulses from, and distributes to, eight thodu varman. In line with Ayurveda, a total of 108 varman may also be found in the Dravidian system, although Dravidian medicine observes many additional varman.


According to Manickavasagam (1993), the Tamil text Odivu Murivu Sara Suthram lists each of the 12 Padu varman and 96 thodu varman. He further claims that there are internal associations between the 96 thodu varman and the 12 padu varman: “Every padu varman point is a collective junction of eight thodu varman. That is, one padu varman contains eight thodu varman” (see table 4).



There is a need for further translation of writings concerned with the Dravidian tradition as many aspects of varman therapeutics are believed to be contained in these texts:


Unfortunately, no systematic attempt has been made so far, either by Tamil savants or by Siddha [Dravidian] medical practitioners, to render with critical evaluation even the major Tamil texts into English. The two main reasons being the enigmatic nature of the texts and the secretive attitude of Siddha practitioners. Nonetheless, an appreciable number of texts in Tamil have been printed, although many of them are still in manuscript form, preserved in libraries in Tamil Nadu. According to Velan, there are over 700 Siddha texts in Tamil, of which 180 have been printed (Subbarayappa, 1997). 

The Dravidian varman model #2

Translation of Varman-adi Shastra


Interviews with varman practitioners in districts of Kerala, South India, revealed other sources of information for varman-adi (action of varman) that presented different locations for the twelve Padu varman on the human body.

According to Balachandran Nair, a Kalaripayattu practitioner in Trivendrum, much of the deeper knowledge of varman has gone “underground”. Issues to do with correct point location and techniques for opening and closing the varman were not openly taught for many reasons. “Modern ideas concerning varman lack the keys for the understanding of their use and their connection to the primal force that maintains life” (Nair, private communication 17/10/98).

In what is believed to be the first English translation of a part of an ancient, privately held text, belonging to a practitioner in Kerala, a different padu varman model has emerged.

The part translation of the unpublished Dravidian (Siddha) text, originally recorded on bamboo, was provided by a Dravidian practitioner. This text, and other bamboo records, were claimed to be over 300 years old (see Figure 1) and provided the location of secret padu (see Figure 2), which differ from the standard locations represented in previous tables (see previous article Dravidian Varman Model #1). This is strong evidence in support of the theory that there are secret varman records in southern India which are not openly taught or revealed.



Master Nair confirmed the above information as correct and provided illustrations of his own family traditional teachings of varman that appears to incorporate varman from models represented in previous tables ie. padu and thodu varman (see Fig 3 & 4).

Dravidian Varman-adi practitioners claim that knowledge of varman is contained in scripture which has been kept intact and secret for thousands of years. These texts support the Dravidian family heritage of martial and therapeutic varman use. The key features of yoga theory and Varman-adi practice lie in the internal connections between varman, underpinning the types of varman and nadi (channels) used in the internal practices of these traditional philosophies. The kundalini, the primal channel which is composed of three pathways, the Ida, Pingala and Sushumna, forms the basis of all channels and varman in the body. According to Dravidian practitioners, the kundalini is the activating principle of life and ascends to the top of the head from its root at the perineum. Chinese medicine recognises three primal channels as Chong mai, Ren mai and Du mai. According to Chinese theory, these three channels are believed to be the first to activate and bring about life in the womb. Originating in the kidneys and then passing to the perineum, their influence ascends to the top of the head along the spine (Matsumoto and Birch, 1986).

According to the marman research by Zarrilli (1992), it is believed that there are physical and subtle marman which “exist in a complimentary and symbiotic relationship”. Zarrilli has cited a set of 32 “yoga” varman which, according to his published interviews with Nair, constitute “the conceptual and practical link between the gross and subtle paradigms of the body” (Zarrilli, 1992, p10). The 32 “yoga” varman listed by Zarrilli in his research are not referenced, but the varman names appear to originate from Sanskrit sources rather than Tamil or Keralan languages, as used by traditional Dravidian or kalaripayattu practitioners. This suggests that the 32 “yoga” varman have a probable link to the Vedic yoga system (see Figure 5).


An additional view of the yoga chakras (see Figure 6) places an emphasis on major and minor varman. It is reported by Tansley (1998) that the major chakras are formed by the intersection of twenty one energy “strands” at the site of the chakra. He further states that the minor chakras are formed by the intersection of forteen energy “strands” and that the marman are locations where seven energy “strands” intersect.

The minor chakras illustrated in Figure 6 appear to be disassociated from the major chakras which have a strong resemblance to the Chinese Daoist tien (energy collection) centres, as used in Tai ji Chuan exercises (see Figure 7). In addition to the 108 varman, Pillai, a Siddha practitioner, claimed that a further 720 varman points are recorded in Dravidian texts and make up a vast network of nadis (Pillai, private communication, 26/11/99).

SOURCE

http://www.markphillips.com.au/

REFERENCES

  • Akkalkotkar P, private communication, Pune, 24/8/98.
  • Ames R, Thomas P, Kasulis T and Dissanayake W; 1998, Self as Image in Asian Theory and Practice, State University of New York Press, New York, USA.
  • Bhide D; private communication, Pune, 4/9/98.
  • Blakney RB; (trans) 1983, The Way Of Life, Lao Tzu, Penguin Group, UK.
  • Bhaktivedanta AC; 1983, Bhagavad Gita As It Is, The Bhaktivedanta Book Trust, West Germany.
  • Bhaktivedanta AC; 1987, Srimad Bhagavatam Canto One, Bhaktivedanta Book Trust, Singapore.
  • Bhishagrantna KL; (trans) 1981, Susruta Samhita, Chowkhamba Series, Varanasi, India.
  • Chen J; 1990, Anatomical Atlas of Chinese Acupuncture Points (2nd ed), Shandong Science and Technology Press, Jinana, China.
  • Date B; private communication, Pune, 26/8/98 to 29/8/98
  • Dahanukar S and Thatte U; 1989, Ayurveda Revisited, Popular Prakashan, Bombay, India.
  • Diophode V; private communication, Pune, 2/11/98.
  • Eckman P; 1996, In The Footsteps of the Yellow Emperor, Cypress Book Company, San Francisco, USA.
  • Fedorova M; 1990, Die Marmantheorie in der Klassischen Indian Medizen, Munchin University, Germany, 1990.
  • Garg AK; 1996, The Manowaha Srotas, Lucknow University, India.
  • Garg AK; private communication, Lucknow, 6/10/98.
  • Hariprapanna VP; (trans) 1983, Rasayogasagara, Krishnadas Ayurveda Series Vol. 1, Varanasi Press, Varanasi, India.
  • Kasulis TP; 1993, Self as body in Asian theory and practice, Suny Press, New York, USA.
  • Kulkarni PH; 1998, Ayurveda Chikitsa, Ayurveda Education Series, Pune, India.
  • Kulkarni PH; private communication, Pune, 4/9/98.
  • Kuti G, private communication, Trivandrum, 21/9/98 to 14/10/98.
  • Lad V; 1985, Ayurveda, The Science of Self Healing (2nd ed), Lotus Press, USA.
  • Larre C and Rochat de la Vallee E; 1995, Rooted In Spirit, Stanton Hill Press, USA.
  • Lee M; (trans) 1992, Master Tong’s Acupuncture, Blue Poppy Press, Boulder, USA.
  • Liu ZC and Hua K; 1999, A Study of Daoist Acupuncture, Blue Poppy Press, USA.
  • Lo V; 1998, The Influence of Yangsheng Culture on Early Chinese Medical Theory, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of London, Department of History, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK.
  • Lu HC; (trans) 1978, A Complete Translation Of The Yellow Emperor’s Classic Of Internal Medicine and The Difficult Classic, The Academy of Oriental Heritage, Vancouver, Canada.
  • McDonald J; private communication, Brisbane. 3/8/00.
  • Macdonnell AA and Keith AB; 1989, Vedic Index of Names and Subjects, Motilal Banarsidass, Varanasi, India.
  • Majumdar A; 1998, Ayurveda, The Ancient Science of Healing, Wheeler Publishing, New Delhi, India.
  • Mallison T; private communication, Histmed@yahoo.groups, 24/10/99.
  • Manickavasagam M; 1993, The Art Of Varmam, A Historical Study, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Madras University, Madras, India.
  • Manohara R; private communication, Ayur@yahoo.groups, 3/3/00 to 14/3/00.
  • Matsumoto K and Birch S; 1986, Extraordinary Vessels, Paradigm Publications, USA.
  • Meulenbeld GJ; 1991, Medical Literature from India, Sri Lanka and Tibet, EJ Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • Nair B; private communication, Trivandrum, 26/8/98 to 19/10/98.
  • Olson S; 1992, Cultivating the Qi, Dragon Door Publications, USA.
  • Pandit SV; private communication, Pune, 5/9/98.
  • Pillai SC; 1994, Vital Life Centres in Thanuology, International Institute of Thanuology, Madras, India.
  • Pillai SC; 1995, Medium Life Centres in Thanuology, International Institute of Thanuology, Madras, India.
  • Pillai SC; private communication, Madras (Chennai), 22/11/99 to 26/11/99.
  • Radhika M; (trans) 1994, Varma Cuttiram, A Tamil Text on Martial Art from Palm-Leaf Manuscript, Hikosaka S, Shimizu N and Subramaniam P (Eds.), Institute of Asian Studies, Madras, India.
  • Ranade S; 1993, Natural Healing Through Ayurveda, Passage Press, USA.
  • Ranade S; private communication, Pune, 1/11/98 to 2/11/98.
  • Rao PVK; 1941, Comparative Study of the Marmas, Govt. India Medical School Hospital, Madras, India.
  • Rogers C; 1989, Point Location and Point Dynamics (revised ed), Acupuncture Colleges Australia, Sydney, Australia.
  • Rogers C; 1997, The Five Keys (3rd ed), Acupuncture Colleges Australia, Sydney, Australia.
  • Ros F; 1994, The Lost Secrets of Ayurvedic Acupuncture, Lotus Press, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Ros F; private communication, Adelaide, 5/5/98.
  • Roscu A; 1981, Les {marman} et les arts martiaux Indiens, Journal Asiatique, 1981, volume cclxix, pp 417-451.
  • Sanjay P; private communication, Trivandrum, 27/8/98.
  • Sharma PV; 1992, History of Medicine in India, from antiquity to 1000 AD, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi, India.
  • Spink MS and Lewis GL; (trans) 1973, Albucasis on Surgery and Instruments, University of California Press, Berkeley, USA.
  • Subbarayappa BV; 1997, Siddha medicine: an overview, The Lancet Journal, Volume 350, Number 9094.
  • Svoboda RE and Lade A; 1995, Tao and Dharma, Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, Lotus Press, USA.
  • Tansley DV; 1998, Radionics and the Subtle Anatomy of Man (9th ed), CW Hilman Co. Ltd, Essex, UK.
  • Thakkur CG; 1974, Ayurveda, The Indian Art & Science of Medicine, ASI Publishers, N.Y., USA.
  • Thatte DG; 1986, Acupuncture, Marma and Other Asian Therapeutic Techniques, Chaukhambah Orientalia, Delhi, India.
  • Thatte DG; (trans) 1994, Susruta Samhita, Chaukhambah Orientalia, Varanasi, India.
  • Thatte DG; private communication, Lucknow, 21/9/98 to 7/10/98.
  • Trikamji J; (trans) 1981, Carakasamhita, Varanasi Press, Varanasi, India.
  • Tsultrim L; private communication, Dharamsala, 1/11/98 to 2/11/98.
  • Unschuld PU; 1985, Medicine In China, A History Of Ideas, University of California Press, USA.
  • Unschuld PU; 1986, Nan-Ching, The Classic of Difficult Issues, University of California Press, USA.
  • Unschuld PU; private communication, Munich, 17/4/00 to 23/4/00.
  • Vogel C; (trans) 1965, Vagbhata’s Astangahrdaya Samhita, Wiesbaden, Germany.
  • Worsley JR; 1990, Traditional Acupuncture, Volume II: Traditional Diagnosis, The College of Traditional Acupuncture, Warwickshire, England.
  • Wujastyk D; 1987, Studies on Indian Medical History, Groningen Press, The Netherlands.
  • Wujastyk D; 1998, The Roots of Ayurveda, Penguin, London, UK.
  • Wujastyk D; private communication, London, 24/1/00 to 22/2/00.
  • Woodroffe J; 1972, The Serpent Power, Ganesh and Co., Chennai, India.
  • Yamashita T; private communication, Tokyo, 21/8/00.
  • Zarrilli P; 1992, The Vital Spots, Journal of Asian Martial Arts, Vol.1, No.22, April.
  • Zarrilli P; 1998, When the Body Becomes All Eyes, OUP Press, Delhi, India.
  • Zysk KG; 1998, Asceticism and Healing in Ancient India, Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, Delhi, India.
    WEB REFERENCES

Ayurvedic Marman

By Dr. Mark Phillips
posted by Ganesh

An introduction to the history of marman

The theory of classical Indian marman can be traced to early Vedic civilisation (1700-1000 BC) (Zysk, 1998) and (Wujastyk, 1987). Originally used in warfare throughout northern and southern India, marman chikitsa has received special attention in southern India, not only for fighting, but for therapeutic use. The Dravidian or southern Indian varman theory is believed to be older than Ayurveda, and its origin may be traced to two historical figures – Parusharam and Agastya (Nair, interview, 21/9/98).

Although these historical figures cannot be traced to any certain date, the warrior Parusharam is mentioned in the ancient Vedic text Bhagavad Purana, that is believed to record an empirical Indian history from around 7000 BC. Parusharam is the historical figure to whom one lineage of varman teaching is attributed (Kuti, interview, 14/10/98).

The second source, the sage Agastya, appears to be a contemporary of the Chinese Lao Tsu (5th Century BC). Agastya’s history is mentioned several times in the text Mahabharata. He is believed to be responsible for many texts on Dravidian varman theory, including some original medical texts held in Dharamsala, northern India, and is referred to as “one who lived for many centuries” and “the sage of Asian appearance” (Nair, interview, 24/9/98). According to some Dravidian practitioners, he is dated to 2500 BC, around the same time as the mythical Chinese emperor Huang Di. The evidence which supports the dates and events surrounding the authors of Sanskrit and Dravidian classical literature is inconclusive and is currently under debate. The dates of artefacts such as those containing the Harappan symbols are uncertain. These symbols, which were found on unearthed stone seals in northern India, have been likened to Chinese characters (Harappa discussions, July, 2000). These non-translated pre-Aryan inscriptions, which are attributed to the civilisations of northern Indian Harappa (2000 BC), affirm an Indian indigenous culture, believed by Indologists to have ended around the period of 1700 BC with the introduction of Vedic culture (Harappa discussions, July, 2000).


There is evidence of Chinese channel theory in the form of a lacquer figurine, from the second century BC, recently found in tombs excavated at the edge of the foothills of Tibet (Lo, 1998). This supports the possibility of the cross pollination of medical ideas, including those of Indian marman and Chinese acupoints. The early northern Dravidian shamanic medicine is thought to have given rise to the eventual development of Ayurveda as a medical system and to have brought about the spread of traditional Indian medical thought to other countries, including Tibet and China.


The extant Ayurvedic texts, plausibly dated to around the 2nd Century BC, define marman as the “107 marman according to Susruta” (Thatte, interview, 21/9/98). This view was accepted by all Ayurvedic practitioners interviewed during field research.

The Dravidian practitioners in the states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu have maintained the use of varman in their traditional medicine. Many techniques using varman are still practised in southern India today, however, these techniques and additional marman appear to be unknown to Ayurvedic practitioners. There are, therefore, two systems of marman to be considered:

1) Ayurvedic marman as recorded by Susruta (5th-2nd Century BC) in the classical text Susruta Samhita, (Sarirasthan, Chapters 6 and 7, trans Thatte, 1994) and later elucidated by such classical writers as Nagarjuna (1st Century BC), Charaka (1st Century AD) and Vagbhata (7th Century AD).

2) The Dravidian varman which is recorded in the undated Varman-adi Shastra (“the books of varman action”); a collection of writings attributed to a long line of teachers, including Agastya and Purusharama.

Both systems recognise 108 marman, including the 107 marman listed by Susruta, suggesting orthodoxy amongst Indian marman doctrines at some stage. The Dravidian varman model, however, claims to use an extra 720 therapeutic varman, in addition to the known marman of Ayurveda (Pillai, private communication, 26/11/99).

Classical Ayurvedic treatment of marman is concerned with recovery from physical trauma. There is no evidence to suggest that marman were considered suitable for therapeutic puncturing, as in the case of Chinese acupuncture. Indeed, marman are believed to contain the elements of life, including the life-force (prana) which supports consciousness. Disturbing the life-force of marman was thought to be detrimental to health, therefore cutting marman was, and still is, prohibited amongst traditional Indian surgeons who follow the precepts of Susruta Samhita. This view of marman has its origin in warfare, and much can be learnt about Indian marman as well as Chinese acupoints from the texts on traditional martial arts (Kasulis, 1993; Rocsu, 1981; Zarrilli, 1998). Further research regarding the vital points of martial arts may enable a better understanding of “secret” points and their little understood contra-indication within both the Chinese and Indian systems.

he Chinese on the other hand, have a long tradition of using therapeutic techniques, including acupuncture on acupoint sites. Evidence of the early development of acupuncture is suggested by the existence of the bian stone needle from the 10th Century BC Shang dynasty (Eckman, 1996) and the 2nd Century BC writings of the Huang Di Nei Jing (trans Veith, 1972). Marxist China in the 1950s produced “a combination of the positive elements of Western and Chinese medicine with the establishment, along Marxist lines, of a new medicine” (Unschuld, 1985, p 252). While the dialectical materialism of Mao Tse-tung contributed to the form of Chinese medicine known as TCM, India had no such creation of a “new medicine”, and the heritage of secret family medical traditions remains. It is possible, therefore, that an arcane knowledge of marman exists in India. This was the view of Ayurvedic practitioners, who believed that ancient varman texts were likely to be in the possession of traditional Dravidian (Siddha) practitioners.

The importance of marman groups and their affects on the human body.

The application of Indian marman appears to fall into two categories. Firstly, marman (lit. secret points) are used therapeutically throughout India in varying forms of massage. Secondly, the ancient systems of warfare (Dhanurveda) and the Dravidian (southern Indian) Varman-adi (lit. the action of varman) are still used in traditional Indian martial arts today. The text Mahabharata records that the warrior caste was well trained in marman-striking with fists and weapons, “for maximum effect with minimum effort” (Date, interview, 26/8/98). These early Vedic records of marman are supported by the medical works of Susruta (500 BC), a surgeon and philosopher who recorded the effects of trauma to marman in the Ayurvedic classic Susruta Samhita (Date, interview, 26/8/98).

Sanskrit texts such as Ashtanga Hridaya (trans Vogel, 1965) and chapters 6 and 7 of Susruta Samhita (trans Thatte, 1994), uphold the vulnerable nature of a marman, listing as a contra-indication any form of surgery across the surface of a marman. Classical Sanskrit texts give a prognosis regarding injury to any marman, classifying them in five groups (See Table 1).



Table 1 illustrates five marman groups that are affected by trauma, according to Susruta. For example, if a group 3 (vishalyaghna) marman is traumatised, the elements of Air and Ether will produce pain or death, depending on how accurately placed the impact is to the anatomical centre of the marman. Depth of penetration into the site of a marman will also determine any pathological outcome (Thatte, interview, 7/10/98). The early Ayurvedic physicians believed that the elemental balance of the human body could be affected by any loss of constitution. When pierced by a projectile, the outcome for group 3 marman is believed to be death, because the elements of Air and Ether are able to escape from the body quickly. It is noted that similar ideas were prevalent in early Chinese medicine, especially concerning the loss of qi through inappropriate needling techniques (Unschuld, 1985, p 583).

According to Ayurvedic and Dravidian philosophy each marman group is ruled by one or two of the Five Elements and has a constitution of up to five types of tissue at the anatomical site of the marman, viz. muscles, vessels, ligaments, bones and joints (trans Thatte, 1994, p 114). These elemental and constitutional components, along with the total number of marman within each group, are listed in Table 2.

Anatomical considerations


Apart from the classification of the five constitutional marman groups, it is believed by some Ayurvedic practitioners that the anatomical consideration of a marman is extremely significant. According to Pandit, Head of Anatomy and Physiology, Tilak Ayurveda Medical College, Pune, a marman occupies the physical area of an organ or a structural mechanism, such as the knee joint. This idea is validated by the historical use of marman in warfare, and by the claim that Susruta was the first person to advocate the dissection of cadavers in order to train surgeons to avoid the structural landmarks of marman (Ranade, 1993). In this view, a marman is seen as a physical structure and does not need any other theory to validate its mechanism, such as the theory of an energy-centre:

When physical trauma is applied to vital areas of the body, such as the basti marman, located in the region on the anterior mid-line and superior to the edge of the pubic synthesis, effects such as reproductive dysfunction will result. In the example of trauma to basti marman, the prognosis will be impotence in males due to the blockage of the physical structure of the channel (srota), the ductus vas deferens (Pandit, interview, 5/9/98).

This view was reflected by teachers at many Indian Ayurvedic colleges. Marman are often taught from a surgical viewpoint, with cadaver dissection a common teaching practice in India today. The marman locations are taught in a traditional manner, in chart form, according to the precepts of Susruta Samhita (See Fig. 1).

The Susruta Samhita records the anatomical divisions of marman according to tissue types and structures at the body sites (see Table 3). Additionally, Susruta and other classical commentators have listed the number of marman in five body regions (see Table 4).

Marman are believed to be inter-connected by the manifestation of “pranic currents of energy in the body” (Lad, 1985, p 56). The prana (life force), which is believed to circulate to the marman, can be categorised according to the element and dosha components found at the site. The importance of prana in the role of marman action appears to correlate with the Chinese model of qi circulation. Prana circulation in the human body has been recognised for at least 4,000 years, as illustrated by the ancient inscription “Seal of the Indus Valley” (2000 BC), excavated at Mohenj-Daro by Sir John Marshal (Zysk, 1998). This ancient Indian relief of a seated human figure is seen to have “meridian lines (vital air passages) which connect with vital points” (Manickavasagam, 1993, p 19) (See Fig. 2). This suggests an ancient Indian view, similar to that of the Chinese concept of qi and its circulation through the jingluo (network influence), as reflected in the writings of the Nan Ching (The Classic of Difficult Issues), a text believed to date to the 2nd Century BC (Unschuld, personal communication, 23/4/00).


Dosha and subdosha


Dosha and subdosha theory is central to disease aetiology in Ayurvedic diagnosis according to the classical texts of Charaka Samhita 9.4 and Vagbhata Samhita 11.45. Additionally, Marman and their therapeutic relationships with dosha and subdosha are reportedly recorded in the texts of other Indian philosophical traditions, such as yoga treatise:

The deeper roots of marman science can be understood in terms of yogic science. This involves the nervous system and the three primary nerve roots, the Ida, Pingala and Sushumna, commonly referred to as the Kundalini (Date, interview, 29/8/98).

Several Ayurvedic practitioners believed that classical writings on marman still exist in southern India, although secrecy surrounds their existence:

Historically, the early invasion and destruction of northern Indian culture has meant that many classical texts on medical science either went to Tibet or to southern India in order to survive. Secrecy was important, to ensure the survival of tradition and knowledge. Today we are left with this secrecy, and only a few people have inherited traditions such as marman (Date, interview, 29/8/98).

According to Unschuld (1985), the early invasions of northern India before 500BC accelerated a cross-pollination of ideas with Chinese culture. The original meanings of some ideas were lost in the translation from Sanskrit to Chinese, as in the case of the word “dosha”. It is believed that aspects of Ayurveda, including Ayurvedic surgery (shalya tantra) and Indian martial arts were introduced into China, both openly and secretly, before the time of Hwato (1st Century AD).

Ayurvedic practitioners agree that trauma to a region of a marman may cause derangement to human physiology by influencing the doshas and subdoshas. Each of the three doshas, (kapha, pitta and vata) are potential faults in health (Lad, 1985). According to interviewed Ayurvedic practitioners, the doshas exist in the body by the interaction of the five elements, maintaining balance and supporting the physiological function of the body. The subdivisions of a dosha, the subdoshas, are believed to carry out specific functions according to the elemental qualities of the “parent” dosha (See Fig.3). Ayurvedic practitioners believed that a marman has the potential to disturb the doshas and subdoshas, or to restore healthy physiological function.

The tridosha is further divided into 15 subdoshas which are thought to play a central role in maintaining the equilibrium of the body, especially the vata (vayu) subdoshas. “Vayu is controlled by prana, and prana is influenced by marman” (Bhide, interview, 4/9/1998). The Sanskrit word vayu is translated as “the wind of the body, the vital air” (Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon, 14/8/2000). This aspect of vata dosha is termed “the maintainer of the human machinery, keeping it in natural order” (Thakkur, 1974, p 37) and is divided into five subdosha components according to Ayurvedic theory. The idea of the five vata (vayu) subdoshas may be compared to the Chinese concept of qi (as air qi, true qi, food qi, defensive qi and nutritive qi) and its functional and anatomical designations according to Macioccia (1989).

In Figure 4 it can be observed that the tridosha is represented in three divisions of the human body. Ayurvedic practitioners believe that balance is maintained in the body by complimenting opposite qualities within the three body regions in the following ways:

  • Vata dosha is believed to have ascending qualities. It is located in the pelvic region, thus countering the descending function of the intestines by the ascending qualities of vata.
  • Pitta dosha is thought to relate to Fire and Water. It is regarded as the centre of life and maintains digestion.
  • Kapha dosha is considered to have descending qualities. It is located in the chest region and is said to be kept buoyant by the ascending influence of the lungs.

Ayurvedic theory holds that vitiated doshas are pathological and will affect the subdoshas, the biological regulators within the human body, thus affecting the physiological balance of a human being (Bhide, interview, 4/9/1998). According to Susruta Samhita, marman will directly influence the dosha in conformity with the marman group concerned (see Table 1).


Figure 5 illustrates the similarities found within the three divisional systems of Ayurveda and Chinese medicine. According to Ayurveda, the chest “houses” the influence of the lungs and heart, and therefore requires the nourishing effect of kapha dosha which is seen to reside in the region of the chest. The area below the navel is considered to be heavy and viscous by nature and requires the light, elevating influence of vata dosha which is said to reside in the hypogastric region.



The five vata (vayu) subdoshas in Figure 6 are thought to be responsible for the functions of respiration, speech, appetite, circulation and evacuation (Thakkur, 1974). They are believed to represent homeostatic functions in the body and include physiological mechanisms such as cell excitation (Dahanukar and Thatte, 1989). Organ function is thought to be governed by the 15 subdoshas which represent different aspects of prana. This is similar to the Chinese idea of qi; “Qi takes various forms in the body fulfilling a variety of functions” (Macioccia, 1989, p 41). These forms of qi can be described as “gathering qi”, “true qi”, “nutritive qi” and “defensive qi”, each originating from “original qi” and assigned to a particular organ (Macioccia, 1989). A summary of information received from Ayurvedic interview sources regarding the theoretical role of the 15 subdoshas, their body site and their physiological action, is provided in Table 5.


The paired marman according to Susruta Samhita

The 107 marman, according to Susruta Samhita, are illustrated by Fedorova (1990) (see Figure 7). Of these, 16 are said to form eight pairs. Each of the pairs represent an anatomical symmetry between the proximal, medial or distal aspects of the upper and lower limbs. These paired marman are illustrated in Figure 8 and listed in Table 6 with their Chinese equivalents. The relationship between the marman which are paired appears to be based on anatomy, although it is claimed that traditional Indian and Chinese medical theory and practice was predominantly physiological and pharmacological, not anatomical (Ames et al, 1998).


The location of six of the eight paired marman were found to be consistent amongst Indian practitioners. The two exceptions are ksipra and indrabhasti and the former has a correspondence in the Chinese system, known as “the four gates” (si guan).

Mind Movement Channels – manowaha srotas

The manowaha srotas system is a controversial theory currently receiving attention from Ayurvedic scholars. Translated as “mind movement channels” (Garg, 1996), this theoretical system claims that consciousness pervades every cell of the body through the medium of a subtle channel system, governed by the mind. These channels carry prana and form a network affecting all aspects of emotional and physical health. “Prana is the active principle within marman, with the potential to influence emotional and physical health” (Thatte, interview, 5/10/98). The relationship between the mind, body and soul are referred to as “the tripod of life” in the text Charaka Samhita (trans Trikamji, 1981) and the “mind movement channels” (manowaha srotas) are believed to be the key to the communication of all channel systems (srotas) within the human body. This Ayurvedic model of the subtle movements of prana, which originate from mental and emotional states, resembles the Chinese idea of a qi network of energy channels and the traditional Chinese idea that the mind and emotions play a major role in the physical health of the individual (Neijing Su Wen, Ch 39, trans Lu, 1978).

The classical texts concerning the “mind movement channels” become highly technical within the paradigm of Ayurvedic theory. However, several points were found to be within the parameters of this research:

All channels (srotas) in the human body are divided into two types, visible and invisible.

  • The visible srotas include arteries, veins and any structure which carries substances.
  • The “mind movement channels” (manowaha srotas) are invisible. According to contemporary Ayurvedic sources, they include the impulses that are conducted along afferent and efferent nerve fibres and are believed to support consciousness (Garg, interview, 6/10/98).

The invisible manowaha srotas can utilise the visible srotas, such as the intestinal tract, as the need may be, according to time of day and season (Manickavasagam, 1993).

  • Arterial blood in the human body constitutes one extra marman (dhamani marman) because of its association with the heart and its potential vitiation by the doshas. Therefore the total Ayurvedic marman count can be estimated at 108 (trans Thatte, 1994).
  • The heart is the “seat” of consciousness because it forms the centre of the manowaha srotas (Bhela Sharira 7.3 and Charaka Nidana 7:4, trans Manohara, personal communication, 10/3/00).
  • The heart is affected by pathogenesis when the “mind channels” are disturbed, and the power of thinking becomes deranged as blood (dhamani marman) is vitiated by the doshas (Bhela Chikitsa 8.10)

According to interview data, Ayurvedic texts explain three important features of the relationship between the “mind movement channels” and “the tripod of life” (mind, body and soul) as follows:

  1. The mind (manas) and the intellect (chitta) are associated with consciousness and are energetically placed in the heart region (Charaka Sharira 7.8; Susruta Sharira 4.34). The heart is therefore believed to be the “seat of consciousness”.
  2. The cognitive mind is associated with sense organs in the head region and is located between the head and the palate (Bhela Samhita Chikitsa 8.2)
  3. The mind is connected with the movement of all body parts and the bodily manifestation of consciousness: “The mind has channels to move to the seat of the senses” (Charaka Vimana 5.7)

Unlike Chinese medicine, Ayurveda does not treat consciousness through the heart channels, but rather, through the mind. The text Charaka Samhita places importance on the employment of nasal medication (nasya) for mental/emotional disturbances, however there is no specific medication recommended for “disturbed consciousness of the heart” (hrdayashuddhi) (Manohara, private communication, 7/3/00). Chinese acupuncture, on the other hand, has effective protocols for the treatment of mental (Shen) disturbances, using the heart and pericardium channels, as well as calming the emotional states which relate to other organs that can disturb the Shen

The practitioner and historian, Manohara, paraphrased the commentary by Chakrapani on the classical text Charaka Chikitsa 9.5:

It is not so clear what the text means by “manovahasrotas”. It could mean the ten blood channels (dhamanis) arising from the heart, or the entire body as such. Elsewhere, he [Chakrapani] admits his inability to speak on such topics, probably because he did not practice Yoga (Charaka Vimana 5.8). Yet, in another place, he states that consciousness is all pervading, both inside and outside the body. Spirit (consciousness) is described not in terms of its presence, but only in terms of degrees of manifestation. In its purest aspect, it manifests in the heart when the mind is stilled. It manifests as intelligence through the mind in the head, and as awareness in different degrees in other parts of the body. (Manohara, personal communication, 10/3/00).

Ayurvedic practitioners believe that the mind is an important instrument in manifesting consciousness, while the heart (hridaya) is said to be the seat of consciousness and the ultimate recipient of vitiated doshas: “Thought, the origin of mind, is located in the heart” (Bhela Chikitsa l8.3, trans Manohara, private communication, 6/3/00).

The Chinese metaphor for the heart, the “Emperor of the kingdom”, is elucidated in the classical text, the Huang Di Neijing Suwen: “The heart is the monarch from whom the spirits are derived” (trans Lu, 1978, p 57). The Huang Di Neijing Lingshu Chapter 8, refers to the heart network channels as xin xi:

[Xin xi] is all the connections and networks of animation by which the heart is linked to the whole body, and especially used for the direct influence of the heart as the master on the very inner part of the vitality in the other zang [solid organ]. It is a kind of organisation of the mental, psychological and spiritual life (Larre and Rochat de la Vallee; 1995, p 131).

These classical Indian and Chinese images of the heart as a “house” and “ruler” of consciousness reflect a common view. The Ayurvedic idea of the “mind movement channels” (manowaha srotas) and the Chinese model of the “heart channels” (xin xi) recognise a life force, that of prana and qi respectively, which is believed to circulate and support life functions. The early texts of Ayurveda reflect the view that ten heart channels (dharmani) originate in the heart (Manohara, personal communication, 3/3/00). This idea is consistent with the Ma Wang Di manuscripts (186 BC), reportedly the oldest extant texts of Chinese medicine, in which it is said “the meridians all originate independently from the heart, instead of being an interconnected system for the circulation of qi” (Denmei, 1990, p 112). It is therefore assumed that the heart, prana circulation and the marman have an intimate relationship which resembles the Chinese idea of the heart, qi and jingluo (channel network) or the xin xi (heart channels). Certainly, the Indian concept of spirit (atma) is comparable to the Chinese idea of “divine spirit” (Shen) as “the guarantor of the unity of a person’s existence” (Larre and Rochat de la Vallee, 1995, p 174).

SOURCE

http://www.markphillips.com.au/

REFERENCES

  • Akkalkotkar P, private communication, Pune, 24/8/98.
  • Ames R, Thomas P, Kasulis T and Dissanayake W; 1998, Self as Image in Asian Theory and Practice, State University of New York Press, New York, USA.
  • Bhide D; private communication, Pune, 4/9/98.
  • Blakney RB; (trans) 1983, The Way Of Life, Lao Tzu, Penguin Group, UK.
  • Bhaktivedanta AC; 1983, Bhagavad Gita As It Is, The Bhaktivedanta Book Trust, West Germany.
  • Bhaktivedanta AC; 1987, Srimad Bhagavatam Canto One, Bhaktivedanta Book Trust, Singapore.
  • Bhishagrantna KL; (trans) 1981, Susruta Samhita, Chowkhamba Series, Varanasi, India.
  • Chen J; 1990, Anatomical Atlas of Chinese Acupuncture Points (2nd ed), Shandong Science and Technology Press, Jinana, China.
  • Date B; private communication, Pune, 26/8/98 to 29/8/98
  • Dahanukar S and Thatte U; 1989, Ayurveda Revisited, Popular Prakashan, Bombay, India.
  • Diophode V; private communication, Pune, 2/11/98.
  • Eckman P; 1996, In The Footsteps of the Yellow Emperor, Cypress Book Company, San Francisco, USA.
  • Fedorova M; 1990, Die Marmantheorie in der Klassischen Indian Medizen, Munchin University, Germany, 1990.
  • Garg AK; 1996, The Manowaha Srotas, Lucknow University, India.
  • Garg AK; private communication, Lucknow, 6/10/98.
  • Hariprapanna VP; (trans) 1983, Rasayogasagara, Krishnadas Ayurveda Series Vol. 1, Varanasi Press, Varanasi, India.
  • Kasulis TP; 1993, Self as body in Asian theory and practice, Suny Press, New York, USA.
  • Kulkarni PH; 1998, Ayurveda Chikitsa, Ayurveda Education Series, Pune, India.
  • Kulkarni PH; private communication, Pune, 4/9/98.
  • Kuti G, private communication, Trivandrum, 21/9/98 to 14/10/98.
  • Lad V; 1985, Ayurveda, The Science of Self Healing (2nd ed), Lotus Press, USA.
  • Larre C and Rochat de la Vallee E; 1995, Rooted In Spirit, Stanton Hill Press, USA.
  • Lee M; (trans) 1992, Master Tong’s Acupuncture, Blue Poppy Press, Boulder, USA.
  • Liu ZC and Hua K; 1999, A Study of Daoist Acupuncture, Blue Poppy Press, USA.
  • Lo V; 1998, The Influence of Yangsheng Culture on Early Chinese Medical Theory, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of London, Department of History, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK.
  • Lu HC; (trans) 1978, A Complete Translation Of The Yellow Emperor’s Classic Of Internal Medicine and The Difficult Classic, The Academy of Oriental Heritage, Vancouver, Canada.
  • McDonald J; private communication, Brisbane. 3/8/00.
  • Macdonnell AA and Keith AB; 1989, Vedic Index of Names and Subjects, Motilal Banarsidass, Varanasi, India.
  • Majumdar A; 1998, Ayurveda, The Ancient Science of Healing, Wheeler Publishing, New Delhi, India.
  • Mallison T; private communication, Histmed@yahoo.groups, 24/10/99.
  • Manickavasagam M; 1993, The Art Of Varmam, A Historical Study, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Madras University, Madras, India.
  • Manohara R; private communication, Ayur@yahoo.groups, 3/3/00 to 14/3/00.
  • Matsumoto K and Birch S; 1986, Extraordinary Vessels, Paradigm Publications, USA.
  • Meulenbeld GJ; 1991, Medical Literature from India, Sri Lanka and Tibet, EJ Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • Nair B; private communication, Trivandrum, 26/8/98 to 19/10/98.
  • Olson S; 1992, Cultivating the Qi, Dragon Door Publications, USA.
  • Pandit SV; private communication, Pune, 5/9/98.
  • Pillai SC; 1994, Vital Life Centres in Thanuology, International Institute of Thanuology, Madras, India.
  • Pillai SC; 1995, Medium Life Centres in Thanuology, International Institute of Thanuology, Madras, India.
  • Pillai SC; private communication, Madras (Chennai), 22/11/99 to 26/11/99.
  • Radhika M; (trans) 1994, Varma Cuttiram, A Tamil Text on Martial Art from Palm-Leaf Manuscript, Hikosaka S, Shimizu N and Subramaniam P (Eds.), Institute of Asian Studies, Madras, India.
  • Ranade S; 1993, Natural Healing Through Ayurveda, Passage Press, USA.
  • Ranade S; private communication, Pune, 1/11/98 to 2/11/98.
  • Rao PVK; 1941, Comparative Study of the Marmas, Govt. India Medical School Hospital, Madras, India.
  • Rogers C; 1989, Point Location and Point Dynamics (revised ed), Acupuncture Colleges Australia, Sydney, Australia.
  • Rogers C; 1997, The Five Keys (3rd ed), Acupuncture Colleges Australia, Sydney, Australia.
  • Ros F; 1994, The Lost Secrets of Ayurvedic Acupuncture, Lotus Press, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Ros F; private communication, Adelaide, 5/5/98.
  • Roscu A; 1981, Les {marman} et les arts martiaux Indiens, Journal Asiatique, 1981, volume cclxix, pp 417-451.
  • Sanjay P; private communication, Trivandrum, 27/8/98.
  • Sharma PV; 1992, History of Medicine in India, from antiquity to 1000 AD, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi, India.
  • Spink MS and Lewis GL; (trans) 1973, Albucasis on Surgery and Instruments, University of California Press, Berkeley, USA.
  • Subbarayappa BV; 1997, Siddha medicine: an overview, The Lancet Journal, Volume 350, Number 9094.
  • Svoboda RE and Lade A; 1995, Tao and Dharma, Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, Lotus Press, USA.
  • Tansley DV; 1998, Radionics and the Subtle Anatomy of Man (9th ed), CW Hilman Co. Ltd, Essex, UK.
  • Thakkur CG; 1974, Ayurveda, The Indian Art & Science of Medicine, ASI Publishers, N.Y., USA.
  • Thatte DG; 1986, Acupuncture, Marma and Other Asian Therapeutic Techniques, Chaukhambah Orientalia, Delhi, India.
  • Thatte DG; (trans) 1994, Susruta Samhita, Chaukhambah Orientalia, Varanasi, India.
  • Thatte DG; private communication, Lucknow, 21/9/98 to 7/10/98.
  • Trikamji J; (trans) 1981, Carakasamhita, Varanasi Press, Varanasi, India.
  • Tsultrim L; private communication, Dharamsala, 1/11/98 to 2/11/98.
  • Unschuld PU; 1985, Medicine In China, A History Of Ideas, University of California Press, USA.
  • Unschuld PU; 1986, Nan-Ching, The Classic of Difficult Issues, University of California Press, USA.
  • Unschuld PU; private communication, Munich, 17/4/00 to 23/4/00.
  • Vogel C; (trans) 1965, Vagbhata’s Astangahrdaya Samhita, Wiesbaden, Germany.
  • Worsley JR; 1990, Traditional Acupuncture, Volume II: Traditional Diagnosis, The College of Traditional Acupuncture, Warwickshire, England.
  • Wujastyk D; 1987, Studies on Indian Medical History, Groningen Press, The Netherlands.
  • Wujastyk D; 1998, The Roots of Ayurveda, Penguin, London, UK.
  • Wujastyk D; private communication, London, 24/1/00 to 22/2/00.
  • Woodroffe J; 1972, The Serpent Power, Ganesh and Co., Chennai, India.
  • Yamashita T; private communication, Tokyo, 21/8/00.
  • Zarrilli P; 1992, The Vital Spots, Journal of Asian Martial Arts, Vol.1, No.22, April.
  • Zarrilli P; 1998, When the Body Becomes All Eyes, OUP Press, Delhi, India.
  • Zysk KG; 1998, Asceticism and Healing in Ancient India, Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, Delhi, India.
    WEB REFERENCES